“A Ride by North Philly Rows,” Ron Tarver, 1993. Courtesy of the artist
“A Ride by North Philly Rows,” Ron Tarver, 1993. Courtesy of the artist

The lone cowboy of the American West is an iconic image ingrained into the fabric of our national identity — and it’s only been bolstered by aggrandizing representations in cinema, television, and advertisements. But what is often omitted from these narratives are the long and revered traditions of black communities that have kept and trained horses for centuries.

Black Cowboy,
an exhibition of pictures and video now on view at the Studio Museum in Harlem, celebrates these long overlooked traditions, and challenges the conventional cowboy archetype of the grizzly white male. Amanda Hunt, an associate curator at the museum who organized the exhibition, spoke with BuzzFeed News on the significance of Black Cowboy.

For the complete story, visit Buzzfeed.com/News/PhotoEssay.

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